Margot Robbie, Finn Cole & Miles Joris-Peyrafitte Interview: Dreamland

Dreamland is about a young teen boy who is put in a difficult situation when he must decide to turn in a beautiful fugitive who was suspected of murder or help her flee to Mexico. This film is set during The Great Depression during the 1930’s and highlights the harsh conditions this small town had to endure in order to survive. 

A Lucky Chap Entertainment Production film staring Margot Robbie (Suicide Squad, The Wolf of Wall Street, I, Tonya) as Allison Wells a fugitive bank robber on the run as she is suspected to have murdered a young girl in the process. Margot Robbie starred and also produced this film

Finn Cole (Peaky Blinders, Animal Kingdom) plays young teen Eugene Evans who is put in a difficult position to help fugitive or turn her in for a very hefty bounty.

Miles Joris-Peyrafitte, a relatively new up and coming director, He  directed, co-wrote and co-scored the film which went on to win the Special Jury Award. He has taken this beautifully shot film in New Mexico and recreated the Great Depression to help tell this thrilling story. 

Dreamland is now available on VOD and Digital platforms, and playing in select theaters.

You guys, another amazing film for Lucky Chap Entertainment. Congratulations. It was a great film. Thank you so much for spending time with me and answering some of my questions. I’m going to go down the line. First question is for Finn ever since his father left, Eugene was always longing for something and he didn’t feel quite connected to where he was. Was Allison a true catalyst for where he ended up or was that path already destined for him?

Finn Cole: Definitely, but also the fact Allison had a big bounty on her head was, was the start of that. That was exciting for him and his friend in this kind of small town with not much going on and when the reality of it hit, I think other emotions and other feelings kind of took over. And that’s why he kind of decided to go on the journey that he did. But yeah, it’s interesting to follow a story, sort of a coming of age story like that. You start the story, you know, him, him missing his father and not having that part of his life, I think was a huge, you know, had a huge effect on him. And then as things evolve and as the story evolves his kind of insensitive change. And that was really fun to explore.

Amazing. Margo, Allison is a very complex character and the use of flashbacks was a great way to fill us in and who she really was in your opinion, did she really care about what Eugene’s initial perception of her was and going forward Can we expect you to wear multiple hats for each film that you work on?

Margot Robbie: To answer your second question first? No, I, I really liked getting to just be an actor on some films and on other films, I really, really loved being able to do both. I feel like I’m ingratiated into that world so much earlier on in the process and it’s, it’s incredibly informative to the acting side. But did she care about what Eugene thought about initially? No, I think she was manipulating him to begin with, I think, yeah, I think her intentions were more simple at that point. And then I think,I think she really, really kid what she, what, what Eugene thought of her. I think in fact kind of like his soul was almost at stake based on whether Eugene thought she was a bad person or not at some point in that story. And that is something she was not expecting.

This was an amazing film and you did an amazing job directing now this time period is rarely looked at compared to other time periods in history. The landscape for this film was amazing in order to recreate this setting for the film. Where did you draw inspiration from? And were there any obstacles that you came up across, you know, while trying to achieve this goal?

Miles Joris-Peyrafitte: Yeah, totally. There were you know, I tried to avoid as many movies as possible. There were certain periods we looked at like we looked at days of heaven but more as a reference in terms of how to keep the feeling of it kind of open. Yeah we looked at the Grapes of Wrath was kind of the movie that for me, was the benchmark in terms of how do you articulate this time in this place? But you know, part of it was also like we’re so inundated with there there’s some, the, the photography of that era is like the greatest American photography or some of it Dorothy Lang or, you know, you can go on and on Walker Evans. So there was, there was an incredible amount of, of references for that. And then it was really about finding that, that landscape in New Mexico that was going to let the two characters explode out of it. You know what I mean, kind of have the potential to be incredibly claustrophobic at the same time as being incredibly vast and that the kind of claustrophobia of it comes from the vastness and the infinite possibility of it.

Now this last question is for all of you, if how are the conditions on set while filming this? I can only imagine, you know, just the landscape is crazy enough. Were there any things that stood out to you compared to any of the other projects you guys have worked on?

Margot Robbie: We would definitely call doing that lake scene.

Finn Cole: Oh my God. Oh my God. That was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do on camera.

20 degrees or something like that.

Finn Cole: Yeah. Very cold.

Miles Joris-Peyrafitte: I had half, half wetsuits on underneath and were like ripped. I felt so bad. There was one more, we were like, should we try and do it in one shot? So you guys can get out and they were such champions. They were like, no, no, it’s a weirdly, Oh, thing that I did not think it was gonna be so hard because we saw you see so many movies of different periods and stuff, but the more forward we go in time, the less stuff there is from back then, meaning cars, there are the less, you know, actual costume and things like that. So there was, I remember the cars specifically was like, what do you mean? There’s only like two of these left in the world. Like there’s like 40 of them in that movie, you know? Yeah, super temperamental. Luckily I didn’t have to drive them, but they spent a lot of time just sitting in cars that only half worked.

More: Read Screen Rant’s Dreamland Review